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Types of Lake Weeds and How to Control Them

June 17, 2019

Common Lake Weeds and How to Eliminate Them

Lake weeds are an important part of a lake’s eco system and a healthy water environment. However, when weeds over-grow in your lake or dock and swim area, it can make swimming or using your boat very difficult. No one wants to swim in weeds, or cast a line, only to catch a big chunk of plants. Luckily, there are easy ways to get rid of lake weeds in your dock and swim area so you can enjoy your time on the water!

Aquatic weeds come in all shapes and sizes. Most are rooted in the bottom of the lake and grow up towards the surface. These weeds are called submerged weeds, and can be treated with a variety of different aquatic herbicide options. So how do you know what weeds you have and how to treat them? Below is our list of common weed types you may find in your water and options that Lake Restoration carries to control them.

Milfoil 

   

Eurasian            Northern 

There are two more common types of milfoil; Northern watermilfoil and Eurasian Watermilfoil. Northern milfoil is native to the United States and is a non-invasive plant. Eurasian Watermilfoil is non-native, and can often over grow, choking out native species of plants. Besides being native and non-native, the milfoil cousins have a few other distinct differences based on appearance. Eurasian milfoil has a reddish stem and can grow nearly 10ft in length and form dense mats. Eurasian milfoil has a more distinct leaf pattern of four finely divided leaves whorled around its stem, while Northern milfoil has a fluffier, more feather like appearance, and leaves aren’t as distinct.

How to treat: A number of herbicides will help eliminate milfoil species, including Dibrox® Herbicide, Hydrothol Granular Herbicide. 2 4 d products like our Navigate pellets and Liquid 2 4 d are great options too.

Curly-Leaf Pondweed

 

Curly-leaf pondweed is another common weed found in lakes. Its leaves resemble lasagna noodles and are dense and crispy-like. It has a red stem, and is considered an invasive species in the United States. It often outcompetes native plants for sunlight, since it grows thick near the surface.

How to treat: Hydrothol Granular Herbicide and Aquathol K, or Aquathol Super K are excellent choices for this plant in lakes.

Coontail

 

Coontail is a native plant that is a great part of a water eco system. It grows near the surface, and in mid summer, it can form thick mats. It has a varied leaf pattern and often is identified by the bushy racoon “tail” at the end of the plant.

How to treat: If coontail takes over your water, Dibrox® and Hydrothol will be able to treat it.

Hydrilla

 

Another invasive plant common in lakes around the U.S. is hydrilla. Hydrilla is an aggressive invader with 3-8 leaves per whorl. It does have toothed leaves. It is often confused with the native plant, elodea.

How to treat: Hydrilla can be treated using Hydrothol or Dibrox®.

There are many other types of aquatic weeds. They come in all shapes and sizes, and Lake Restoration has a solution for any of your aquatic plants! Check out all our aquatic plant solutions at LakeRestoration.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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